How Do You Deal With Battery Terminal Corrosion?

Corroded battery terminals usually cause more problems than just poor starting of your car. There are of course, extreme cases of corrosion, but even the minor ones can still reduce alternator output by a huge percent stressing the charging system and causing other early battery failures. The extra resistance leads to slower cranking, premature starter failure and overheated starter motor windings. It is fortunately possible to prevent the issues by stopping the corrosion.

One of the best ways of keeping the battery working for longer is by trying every means possible to stop battery terminal corrosion. Acid leaks from the battery often lead to less damages to the terminals and through prevention and proper cleaning you can be in a position to stop the effects of corrosion.

Prevention

To stop corrosion on the terminals, you should try using petroleum jelly on them. This can be done by removing the connector cables on the battery and coating posts liberally with the jelly before reattaching the cables. The coating allows electrical current to flow freely and at the same time protects your battery from potential corrosion.

Still on protection you can consider painting the posts using silicone spray. Most auto stores will have the spray and it works in the same way as the jelly. Simply remove the connections from the battery and spray the paint onto the posts, then allow proper drying before reconnecting your cables to keep the battery corrosion free. It may also be a good idea to consider getting cable terminal covers or protective covers for battery negative and positive to keep your battery in top condition and functioning as it should.

Cleaning

In case you are not able to protect the terminals from corrosion and you are already dealing with a case, cleaning can offer the much needed relief from the effects of corrosion. To clean the terminal, you would need to start by disconnecting cable hookups and removing the battery. Using a wire brush and a mix of baking soda and warm water, you can then thoroughly clean out the area. You should allow it to dry properly before replacing your battery. It is a simple cleaning method that helps in fighting corrosion impacts on your charging system and at the same time also prevents further corrosion. You can also clean easily using a spray cleaner and applying acid neutralizing felt pads before finishing the cleaning with an anti-corrosive spray on each terminal.

Replacement

In some case, you may find that you are dealing with extreme cases of corrosion on your battery terminals requiring replacement of the terminals. Replacement may be necessitated when both terminals don’t seem to clamp tightly or the corrosion has eaten away the metal. Green corrosion on copper cables going into molded lead terminal also means it is time to do a replacement. If you must do a replacement, consider copper compression terminal which offers better connection compared to lead terminals which may be cheaper but end up compromising electrical connections.

1977 Chevrolet Aerovette Concept Car

In 1977 GM came out with another version of the Four-Rotor Car and dubbed it the Aerovette. The Aerovette had the same lines as the original design and this time GM pulled out all the stops when making the prototype.

That’s because for all intensive purposes, GM fully intended on producing the Aerovette beginning in 1980. However due to a myriad of complications, the idea never made it past the prototype stage.

The Areovette was shaped in a rectangular way so it would slice through the air with little wind resistance as the name “aero” might suggest. The Aerovette was beautifully detailed both inside and out and the interior was fully engineered which was more proof that the car was intended for production.

The doors of the Areovette opened out and up and were the same “Gullwing” design as the famed Mercedes 300SL Coupe. But the Aerovette doors actually more articulated versus the Mercedes design and that allowed for greater function in tighter parking spots which was a major drawback of the design in the past.

If the Aerovette would have made it to the public it would have had a steel frame that made for extra durability. The suspension was due to come off of the actual Shark Corvette as Zora Duntov suggested that this would be an extreme cost savings measure. The mid-engine Vette was probably going to feature GM’s famed and go to 350 V-8 engine and the transmissions were to be the same as the conventional Vette as well.

In fact, for all that went into the Aerovette, the new style Vette would have been just about in line with what the regular Corvette was going for. GM estimated that the Aerovette would have sold in 1980 for about $15,000 to $18,000 and this was very close to the regular Corvette even though the gullwing doors would have added to the cost significantly.

Unfortunately though, the Chevrolet Aerovette Concept Car was not meant to be and was done in by its biggest supports leaving GM. Both Duntov and Mitchell had already retired and that left the ultimate call to go to other top dogs at GM, one of whom was Dave McLellan. However, McLellan liked the front engine Corvette design much more than he did the Aerovette’s mid engine and that factor was one that had the concept car remain a concept.

Perhaps though the biggest factor that helped make that fateful decision was money. At the time many imports such as Fiat and Porsche had mid engine models and none of them were fairing well in the United States market. Meanwhile Datsun had been selling their 240Z front engine cars in the US at a fast pace, which the brass at GM took instant note of. When it came right down to it, the mid-engine Areovette was deemed too big a risk by McLellan and the other hot shots at GM and would therefore only secure its place in Corvette history as the overachieving concept car that could have been but never was.

Legalized Pot Causes Problems for Police in Colorado

In 2012, Colorado voters overwhelming approved a change to the state’s constitution that allowed the sale and personal consumption of marijuana for recreational use. Sales began in 2014. Since then, the state has issued more than 2,900 marijuana business licenses, 481 of which went to retail dispensaries. As a result, as one media outlet pointed out, Colorado has more pot dispensaries than Starbucks, McDonald’s, and 7-Eleven locations combined.

But even though it’s legal to consume, it remains illegal to drive while under the influence of marijuana. Tragically, far too many drivers appear to be ignoring that and are putting lives in danger by smoking and driving. If you’ve been injured in a car accident because of an impaired driver, a personal injury attorney can help.

Fatal Accidents on the Rise

According to analysis by The Denver Post, the number of drivers involved in fatal car accidents who then tested positive for marijuana has jumped every year since legalization. Higher levels of the drug are also appearing in drivers who tested positive. Last year, in one extreme example, one driver tested at 22 times the legal limit for marijuana.

From 2013-16, Colorado experienced a 40 percent spike in the number of traffic fatalities overall, hitting 880 last year, according to numbers from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The data also reveals that alcohol-related fatalities have been on the rise, climbing 17 percent. The number of drivers who tested positive for marijuana, however, jumped nearly 150 percent, and now make up 10 percent of all fatal car accidents.

While officials are quick to point out that this dramatic increase in marijuana-related traffic deaths can’t be tied conclusively to legalization, the numbers are disturbing.

“Unlike alcohol, THC [the active ingredient in marijuana] can remain detectable in the blood stream for days or weeks, when any impairment wears off in a matter of hours,” Taylor West, former deputy director of the National Cannabis Industry Association, told The Denver Post. “So all those numbers really tell us is that, since legal adult-use sales began, a larger number of people are consuming cannabis and then, at some point… driving a car.”

Testing is a Problem

That’s the problem facing state and local governments. Cannabis use is skyrocketing, but law enforcement officials are still struggling to find a way to definitively test drivers. There’s no marijuana breathalyzer or blood test that police can use to test drivers. There are tests that check for delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, but there isn’t a universally accepted standard that indicates who is actually impaired, despite the frantic efforts of scientists to establish one.

Colorado uses a THC blood test that police can use to reveal what’s referred to as “presumed” impairment. Permissible inference is set at five nanograms of THC per milliliter. Alcohol breaks down quickly in the body, making it easy to test for. THC, on the other hand, can linger much longer in the body. In fact, heavy users who then abstain from marijuana can still test positive a month or more later.

At least two private companies are researching breath detection devices, but scientists estimate they’re months or years away from hitting the market. As a result, Colorado has begun training its officers in what to look for during traffic stops when deciding whether a driver is impaired.